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Doc Savage (2010 series) #18 Comic Book

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Characters

Listed in alphabetical order.


Doc Savage, Ham Brooks, Johnny Littlejohn, Long Tom Roberts, Monk Mayfair, Renny Renwick.

Wallpapers

From this comic.
Doc Savage battles pass through wallpaper
Doc Savage battles pass through

Title:

Raise the Khan, The Final Chapter

Date of Publication
June 2012
Cover Price
$2.99

Our Rating:
3 stars

Credits:

J. G. Jones
Writer
Dan Panosian
Penciler
Dan Panosian
Inker
Thomas Chu
Colorist
J. G. Jones
Cover Penciler
J. G. Jones
Cover Inker
J. G. Jones
Cover Colorist

Comic Book Synopsis / Plot

Written by Peter Silvestro

In the villain’s lab, Doc Savage assures Major Afanasy that the virus in the Apis Bull will enable Doc to perform the surgery that will let Afanasy walk again. Doc takes a call from his aides who invite him to come out and join in the melee between them, the Mongols, the Neanderthals, and Popov’s men. As Doc rushes out, Popov, his aides, and the captive Anya dash in, and the villain orders the release of his enhanced wooly mammoths. Doc mounts one of the animals, seizes control electronically, and them down. Inside Anya slips the guards’ watch and throws the switch that opens the doors, taking an arrow through the back to do so. Afanasy goes berserk and attacks the Mongols…. Doc enters and comes face-to-face with Popov, preparing to shoot him; instead, Afanasy kills the mad scientist with an arrow and collapses from his wounds. Doc promises Afanasy that he will do everything he can to save him, but the dying Soviet agent request that Doc use the Apis Bull to save his daughter….

Epilogue: Doc brings the recovering Anya to visit her father’s grave, where she pays tribute to the fallen hero.

 

Comments


Peter Silvestro (August 7, 2012)
Review (the issue): Lame story/epic art is how to sum up the final issue of the series. The battle scenes with their double-page spreads are exciting, even helping us overlook Dan Panosian’s sleepy-eyed bullet-headed Doc (though not the apish Doc on the final page). Sadly the story looks like they were trying to wrap up the story as quickly as possible, with the resurrection of Genghis Khan—the event that provided the arc’s title—is totally forgotten. The imagination that went into the earlier issues is gone, with a simple bow-and-arrow fight clearing up the details. It’s a shame, really, since J.G. Jones came the closest to capturing the spirit of the original Doc Savage pulps, he just needed a little more time to get the hang of it.

Peter Silvestro (August 7, 2012)
Review (the series): While this series hasn’t been among my favorites, I thought it was finally getting to be acceptable with Jones taking over the writing but DC clearly gave up supporting the title some time ago (the First Wave universe was officially cancelled several months before this issue would have appeared). The First Wave project was imaginative, though it never seemed to know who the target audience was (do comic books fans care about the old pulps? Do old pulp fans care about comic books?) but at least it was better than DC’s previous attempt at bringing the Man of Bronze into the modern era (late 80s/early 90s). The aret was wildly uneven in the s eries, original writer Paul Malmont, though having written THE CHINATOWN DEATH CLOUD PERIL, seemed uncomfortable with penning a new Doc adventure, and all the stories that were foreshadowed in the first arc were thrown out of the window when Brian Azzarello took over. And though Azzarello had written the original FIRST WAVE miniseries, his Doc Savage was a dark and intense war story that was far from the spirit of the original. J.G. Jones had the right idea of juggling over-the-top elements (Mongolian mummies! Cyborg crocoldiles! The resurrection of Genghis Khan!) for a fast-paced spirited adventure, though he was not helped by his artists. Final result: a series that never found its character—someone must have had a vision for what they wanted this series to be, what happened to it? Rather disappointing.

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